Friday, May 8, 2015

Tomie Nagano. Pour L'Amour Du Fil #6


Tomie Nagano is a Japanese quilter who works with indigo fabrics. She uses old antique fabrics that she collects. I thought it would be a bit like the work of Shizuko Kuroha but, though I can hardly explain it, her work looks different to me... not very different but it has a personality of its own.
It may be due to the artist herself. I discovered a person who speaks English, who is lively and enthusiastic. I felt this kind of energy in the quilts rather than the peacefulness I felt in the quilts of Shizuko Kuroha.

Look carefully at the photo above. You will see close-up photos below, and I will show you a piece of fabric which wa unusual in such a piece.

Not only is the work amazing but the quilting is really impressive too! Another great opportunity for me to study the different quilting patterns used.

Enjoy ;-)




A surprising use of yellow and orange for a striking effect.








Back to the first quilt presented in this blog post. The log cabin block is completely de-structured.


Can you see the teeny-tiny yellow heart of the block?



I told you there was a surprising piece of fabric in the quilt of the first photo. Here it is!! I wonder who has noticed it?


Here it is again. Can you spot it? How I would have loved to know the reason why she put this piece of fabric there! I am sure she did it on purpose... But this will remain a mystery.


And now a grandmother's flower garden... the Japanese way...





Log cabin blocks again... love the effect!










 The handquilting adds so much to the texture of these quilts. I am always in awe when I see such amazing quilts, but it requires a shift of mind from my western perspective to really appreciate these quilts. Japanese quilting is different though they use the same blocks and are inspired by western quilting.

Until next post,

11 comments:

  1. Amazing work! Thank you for sharing with us :)

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  2. Merci merci David pour tous ces magnifiques reportages
    Bis
    Claire

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  3. Great posts, David ! Thank you for sharing so many pictures of your visit, we are very lucky to have you for such wonderful reports ! Just like we've been there too :-)

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  4. I find these dramatic and stunning.

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  5. Thank you thank you thank you! This is my favorite post! Every time I see indigo quilts I have goosebumps on my back... I loved the small fabric you spotted :-) I think it is a kind of a frolic act the artist did to cause a smile if we notice it :-)

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  6. I often find that the Japanese quilting enhances the quilt where the European, American and Australian quilting dominates/ takes over the quilt. I am not a fan of Log Cabin quilts but these are beautiful with their visual designs.

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  7. I love Japanese quilts and really enjoyed your post. I like the way they achieve dynamism through subtlety.

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  8. Je partage votre enthousiasme et l'excitation qui a dû être la vôtre devant de telles merveilles. C'est du grand art que votre reportage met en valeur avec beaucoup de subtilité. Je joins mes remerciements à ceux qui vous ont déjà été exprimés ici.

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  9. Very nice pictures, especially the close ups!! The centers of the log cabins are TINY. Love the Japanese version of hexagons. Indigos are one of my favorite fabrics of all time. Thanks for the tours of the designer rooms.

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  10. Your photos are superb! Thanks for sharing!

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